"Pastor Verses Chaplain,
...Are They the Same?"
Inri
"Sowing the Word of God, so all might be saved."

"Pastor Versus Chaplain. Are They the Same?" 

            This discussion post is in reference to Module One, Different Chaplain Ministries; particularly, the differences between ministering in the context of a church and ministering in the context of the chaplaincy; my discussion of the question of whether I think the qualifications for pastors found in 1Timothy and Titus are the same for chaplains and pastor
            The difference between ministering in the context of a church and ministering in the context of the chaplaincy is that, while pastors and chaplains are both called to minister to the flock, or rather, to supply the needs, delegate or conduct religious and/or spiritual support, one usually distinctive difference between the two is that, “chaplains face the challenge of providing loving care to all they encounter-even those whose social or economic status doesn’t seem to warrant help or those whose celebrity already commands attention or assistance.” (Paget and McCormack, p. 5.) Pastors; however, usually provide ministry within a particular religion/denomination/church or parish. When one considers the names identified for those who serve in the roles of pastors, they vary according to particular religions, denominations, etc.
            The historical foundations for Chaplaincy is found in the good deed of an early Christian church man, named Bishop Martin, who was gracious to a beggar. When the bishop died his coat, “…was enshrined as a reminder of the sacred act of compassion. The guardian of the capella became known as the chapelain, which transliterated into English became chaplain.” (Paget and McCormack, p. 3.)  While both pastors and chaplains have a high Call on their lives and on their ministries, there are other principles which they share in common. For example, “Both are teachers, caregivers, witnesses of their own faith, and advocates for people. Both have a desire to equip people to grow in spiritual maturity.” (Paget and McCormack. P. iv) Other similarities and dissimilarities that pastors and chaplains share are that, “Community clergy are given authority by a congregation or ecclesiastical body, whereas chaplains are given authority by the institution that employs them in addition to the ecclesiastical body that endorses them. And community clergy usually minister in a house of worship while the chaplain usually ministers in the marketplace-places not usually considered ‘religious.’” (Paget and McCormick, p. iv.)
            The historical impetus found in the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States, serves a the original legal foundation for chaplaincy. The account goes somewhat like this.
Although the United States   forbids a national religion, the same Constitution protects the individual’s right to the free exercise of religion. People have the right to practice religion in personally meaningful ways, but they also have the right to decline participation. Chaplains serve in a pluralistic arena-multifaith-and therefore, must provide the same ministry to all people in the identified ministry group. (Paget and McCormack, p. 4.)
What is known as the ‘free exercise’ ‘clause’ in the constitution establishes the chaplain ministry in the 1980s, by a Jewish chaplain. This, “…army chaplain helped define the ministry of chaplains by clearly stating that the chaplain’s purpose was to provide for the free exercise of religion for everyone in the command, not just the people who were of the same faith tradition as the chaplain.” (Paget and McCormack. P. 4.)
            The second portion of this discussion post is concerned with whether I think the qualifications for pastors found in 1 Timothy 3:1-7 and Titus 1:5-9 are the same for chaplains and pastors.
In the Book of Titus, we are told, “If anyone is above reproach, the husband of one wife, and his children are believers and not open to the charge of debauchery or insubordination,” (Titus 1:6. ESV) this is a portion of the qualifications which would qualify a person who seeks to be in the position of an elder (pastor).  In this scriptural reference, the elder (pastor) is required to live a life above disgrace or shame (reproach). This is sometimes difficult to do; however, with the assistance of the Holy Spirit, it can be accomplished as much as humanly possible. “And I will ask the Father, and He will give you another Helper, to be with you forever.” (John 14:16.ESV) Furthermore, with respect to the scriptural reference found in 1 Timothy 3, we are told, “Therefore an overseer must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, sober-minded, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not a drunkard, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money.” (1 Tim 3:2,3.ESV)
Both portions of the qualifications found in Titus and 1 Timothy, which I quoted above, are resonantly sonorous concerning the acceptable behaviors which are necessary for one who seeks the positions of each, respectively. Furthermore, each of these qualifications are necessary in order to successfully accomplish the associated duties of an overseer. However, if one continues to read in the two scriptural references (1 Timothy 3:1-7 and Titus 1:5-9), the biblically successful requirements for the position of an overseer is reliant on qualities which are found with the overseer’s family, too. For example, in both scriptural references, also inclusive of the qualifications for an overseer (pastor, elder, bishop) are the various righteous behaviors of the overseer’s family. In the case of the references found in 1 Timothy 3:1-7, the following is stated. “He must manage his own household well, with all dignity keeping his children submissive, for if someone does not know how to manage his own household, how will he care for God’s church?” (1 Tim 3:4,5.ESV) With respect to the scriptural reference found in Titus 1, we find that the Bible states, “If anyone is above reproach, the husband of one wife, and his children are believers and not open to the charge of debauchery or insubordination.” (Titus 1:6.ESV)
It is my belief that when one refers to the biblical references found in 1 Timothy 3:1-7, and Titus 1:5-9, the spiritual ideals are very similar with respect to the qualifications of an overseer (pastor, bishop) and a chaplain. I must include, however, that the biblical references for chaplains may be found in the Book of Matthew, “ ‘For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me.’ ” (Matt 25:35,36.ESV)

           
 
Matthew 25:35,36.KJV.

" For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in:

 Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me."

Matthew 25:35,36.KJV.

" For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in:

Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me."

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